Spring Orchids in the Snow


Filmed between March 21 to early April 2014.

Used many layers and textures to express a sad mood. Where’s springtime? Staring through windows, seeing snow, freezing rain and below freezing nights. No signs of Spring, not even a green blade of grass?

Enjoy this moody show,

Leo

Beauty by Fire


This production shows part of my collection of gems and minerals highlighted by providing specific notations to their chemistry and composition. While organizing the storyboard I wanted to show the beginning of the creation, when minerals are spewed from the center of the Earth. Used some public domain explorations of volcanoes and their caldera.

The piece involved intense manipulation of images, including accented coloration, special lighting, macro photography, animation, motion graphics, and other esoteric effects such as morphing.

The music was key to pace the progress of the presentation. Still some stones left that haven’t seen the light or appeared on the screen :) Perhaps a third chapter on this series may take place in the future.

Enjoy the warmth of the stones,

Leo

Carnaval & Candombe II


Carnaval 2014 comes to an end in Uruguay. Enjoy the Llamadas Parade (Desfile de Llamadas) that takes place in Barrio Sur and also in the main center of Montevideo in Avenida 18 de Julio.
These parades are unique to the country and recognized by UNESCO as Intangible Cultural Heritage.
~
Candombe music: Cuerda Palermitana (remixed and edited). Some scenes: Public Domain. Special thanks to AFP.

Tango Contratiempo


Once I heard the musical composition, I fell in love with this fusion tango, and knew I had to produce a video for it. That was 2 years ago! The approach I took was to make it as syncopated in imagery as the composition itself. As I was making slow progress towards the middle of the project, a new project popped up and I had to put this on ice for a while.

Once I returned to it, I had lost my train of thought and the pace I wanted to maintain. Restarting to tune in and reconnecting with the inspiration did not go smoothly. Hopefully the start-stop-start nature doesn’t show in the final product. Enjoy the show!

Contratiempo – [translation] In music It can be written with silences (in this case as a syncopation written with silences). If the instrument running pace no longer produces sounds. Syncopation in music is the compositional strategy to break the regularity of the rhythm, through the accentuation of a note on a weak spot or a semi-strong compás.
[Spanish] Puede ser escrita con silencios (en este caso se denomina contratiempo). Si el instrumento que ejecuta el ritmo no produce sonidos prolongados, se oirá lo mismo como escrito con notas de síncopa escrita con silencios.
~~
Music: Montserrat (a modern tango fusion) by Bajofondo (live) in Montevideo,  Uruguay (remixed by Leo Bar)
Some photographs of Bs. As. courtesy of Fotografo Volante @ flickr.com/photos/ruggeroarena/

Candombe Carnaval in Uruguay


Uruguay celebrates “Carnaval” over 40 days. Some of the parades and performances have been postponed or delayed due to intense rainstorms and flooding. Here are some tastes of what it feels to be at the celebrations…
Music (remixed) Caminando by Hugo Fattoruso and the Drums of Cuareim (Lonjas de Cuareim)

Enjoy the feast,
Leo

so LONG miLONGa


A tribute to Alfredo Zitarrosa – (March 10, 1936 – January 17, 1989 in Montevideo, Uruguay) was a Uruguayan singer, composer, poet, writer and journalist. He is regarded as one of the most important figures in the popular music of his country and Latin America in general. For more info see my blog :: or en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfredo_Zitarrosa
Vintage 1940′s Montevideo film: Prelinger Collection :: Archive.Org – Public Domain
Music:Zitarrosa by Bajofondo – Remix by Leo Bar
Dancers: Gustavo Rosas & Gisela Natoli (live performance)
Graphics, Digital Paintings: Leo Bar

New York – Two Harlems and Timbales


Come to Spanish Harlem and take a cultural bath!

This is a brief slice of the two of NYC’s neighborhoods, their people and cultures.

Enjoy the show,
Leo
~ History and Background ~
Harlem is known internationally as the Black Mecca of the world, but Harlem has been home to many races and ethnic groups including the Dutch, Irish, German, Italian, and Jewish. Harlem was originally settled by the Dutch in 1658, but was largely farmland and undeveloped territory for approximately 200 years. As New York’s population grew, residential and commercial expansion moved northward, and development of the Harlem territory was expanded.

Hundreds of tenement apartment buildings were built in 1904 anticipating the masses from lower Manhattan to occupy them. Unfortunately for the developers, the IRT subway not only made Harlem available to those from downtown, but also made Washington Heights, the Bronx and other northern points accessible. Developers over speculated and many houses went unsold. Real estate agent and entrepreneur Phillip A. Payton approached several Harlem landlords with the proposition that he would fill their empty or partially occupied properties with Black tenants. The idea was accepted and Payton began moving Black families into buildings of Central Harlem in the 1930’s .

Blacks continued to pour into Harlem from points in lower Manhattan, the American South and the Caribbean. Blacks migrated in record numbers from the south to northern cities in search of opportunities and increased wages.

Considered a stronghold of Latino pride, Spanish Harlem evolved from an immigrant enclave to a multi-cultural treasure trove of sights, sounds, tastes and cultural expressions. The heartbeat of the “Nuyorican” soul, Spanish Harlem is the birthplace of many of Latin music’s most favored artists, such as Tito Puente, Eddie & Charlie Palmieri, Ray Barretto and the home of others from international composer Rafael Hernandez to the great Machito. The popular feminist poet Julia De Burgos lived here while “youngblood” graffiti artist of chalk on the street verses, James de la Vega has a storefront from where he sells his visual wares.

Come to Spanish Harlem and take a cultural bath.