Antelope Canyon Magic

– NOT FOR COMMERCIAL USE –
Creative Commons – Attribution – Non commercial – No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.
HTTP://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/
I am always in love with the desert. As opposed to what most people envision, life thrives in deserts (seasonal), and the beauty is almost always hidden, but of dramatic proportions.
I always felt that this canyon was magical, so I surrounded this production with unique sounds to form the background music. It has influences of Navajo chanting and drums, surreal vibrations and deep throated flute sounds. Once the sound was constructed, I just let the superb beauty of this place guide me… 
 
 Antelope Canyon is located near Page, Arizona, Antelope Canyon is a unique formation known as a slot canyon full of vibrant colors, light and shades.
 
Elements used in this production:
 
Music:
Photography:
 
Background and History:
Antelope Canyon is the most-visited and most-photographed slot canyon in the American Southwest.  It is located on Navajo land near Page, Arizona. Antelope Canyon includes two separate, photogenic slot canyon sections, referred to individually as Upper Antelope Canyon or The Crack; and Lower Antelope Canyon or The Corkscrew.
 
The Navajo name for Upper Antelope Canyon is Tse’ bighanilini, which means “the place where water runs through rocks.” Lower Antelope Canyon is Hasdestwazi, or “spiral rock arches.” Both are located within the LeChee Chapter of the Navajo Nation.
 
Antelope Canyon was formed by erosion of Navajo Sandstone, primarily due to flash flooding and secondarily due to other sub-aerial processes. Rainwater, especially during rainy season, runs into the extensive basin above the slot canyon sections, picking up speed and sand as it rushes into the narrow passageways. Over time the passageways are eroded away, making the corridors deeper and smoothing hard edges in such a way as to form characteristic ‘flowing’ shapes in the rock.
 
Flooding in the canyon still occurs. A flood occurred on October 30, 2006 that lasted 36 hours, and caused the Tribal Park Authorities to close Lower Antelope Canyon for five months.

Hope you enjoy it,

Pix In Motion
Leo Bar
Creative Imagining
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