Andes :: Cordillera Central

(central range)
San Juan province, Argentina

When I connected with Hector Tenaglia a while ago, and while looking at his impressive photographs of the Andes in the Province of San Juan, I got the feeling that this could be a great piece. The majestic Andes range, at this latitude, sports a variety of hues almost like painted out in layers.  Sometimes these colors can be seen variegated and sometimes as straight layers, due to the formation and compression of this massive uprising. Depending on how the sun hits it, you see these tones changing constantly during the day. What a spectacle!

Since I had been experimenting/exploring with light and the lack of it in my imagery, this work surfaced as a clear example of how light impacts us and changes our moods and perceptions…

Elements used in this production

Music: Dragons – Roger Subirana  :: www.jamendo.com/en/track/167882
Photography: Hector Ricardo Tenaglia :: www.Flickr.com/tata536
Aerial Photographs: Courtesy of NASA
HDR Art & Animation: Leo Bar
Background:
The province of San Juan is part of the continental semi-desert Cuyo region. The arid plains on the east, with a few low sierras (hills), swiftly turn into 6,000-meter-high (18,000 ft.) mountain peaks towards the west. Both areas are subject to the dry hot Zonda (a dry foehn wind descending the eastern slopes of the Andes in the central Argentine in winter, probably polar maritime air warmed by descent from the crest which is some 6,000 meters above sea level). Most of the precipitations take place during the summer, often as storms.

The hot wind has modeled the clay-rich red soil into Pampa del Leoncito (Reserva Natural Estricta El Leoncito) and Valle de la Luna (Parque Provincial Ischigualasto) where one can find 200 million year old geological formations.

The Jáchal and San Juan rivers, both part of Desaguadero River system, are the source of fertile valleys and central to the province’s economy. The San Juan River finishes in the Huanacache lagoons (sometimes called Guanacache), on the southeast.

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