Category Archives: Retrospective

Earliest Animation


~The oldest known form of “animation”.~
Belgian physicist Joseph Plateau unveiled an invention in 1832 called the Phenakistoscope, a device that is largely considered to be the first mechanism for true animation. The simple gadget relied on the persistence of vision principle to display the illusion of images in motion.

The phenakistoscope used a spinning disc attached vertically to a handle. Arrayed around the disc’s center were a series of drawings showing phases of the animation, and cut through it were a series of equally spaced radial slits. The user would spin the disc and look through the moving slits at the disc’s reflection in a mirror. The scanning of the slits across the reflected images kept them from simply blurring together, so that the user would see a rapid succession of images that appeared to be a single moving picture.

While Plateau is credited with inventing the device, there were numerous other mathematicians and physicists who were working on similar ideas around the same time, and even they were building on the works of Greek mathematician Euclid and Sir Isaac Newton who had also identified principles behind the phenakistoscope.

Hope you enjoy the moving pictures,

Leo

Funky New York


Scenes from New York circa 1940’s
Music by David Nederland – Tell Me About Oriental Philosophy
jamendo.com/en/list/a146643/good-time-to-start
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

Containing great old photographs by:
Brett Weston (originally Theodore Brett Weston; December 16, 1911, Los Angeles–January 22, 1993, Hawaii) was an American photographer. Van Deren Coke described Brett Weston as the “child genius of American photography.” He was the second of the four sons of photographer Edward Weston and Flora Chandler.
~
Todd Webb (September 5, 1905 – April 15, 2000) was an American photographer notable for documenting everyday life and architecture in cities such as New York, Paris as well as from the American west.[1] His photography has been compared with Harry Callahan, Berenice Abbott, Walker Evans, and the French photographer Eugène Atget. He traveled extensively during his long life and had important friendships with artists such as Georgia O’Keeffe, Ansel Adams and Harry Callahan. His life was like his photos in the sense of being seemingly simple, straightforward, but revealing complexity and depth upon a closer examination. Capturing history, his pictures often transcend the boundary between photography and artistic expression.

Enjoy the funk,
Leo

New York Swings


Not much to tell about this piece, it speaks for itself, or rather swings by itself 🙂
(Check out what cocktails at nightclubs were going for…)
Enjoy the moves and great sound!

Leo

What’s a Diddie ?


This one I made more than a year ago and wasn’t sure to let it see the light. Made it with old photographs and film dating from 1940 – 50’s.
Did it for fun and the exploration of old media.

Here are the lyrics to the song that inspired this work:
There’s a great big mystery, and it sure is worrying me
This Diddie Wa Diddie
Mister Diddie Wa Diddie
I wish somebody would tell me what Diddie Wa Diddie means
The little girl about four feet four, come on papa and give me some more,
of your Diddie Wa Diddie, your Diddie Wa Diddie
I wish somebody would tell me what Diddie Wa Diddie means
I went around and walked around, somebody yelled, said, “Look who’s in town”
Mister Diddie Wa Diddie
Mister Diddie Wa Diddie
I wish somebody would tell me what Diddie Wa Diddie means
Went to church, put my hand on the seat, lady sat on it said, “Daddy, you sure is sweet”
Mister Diddie Wa Diddie
Mister Diddie Wa Diddie
I wish somebody would tell me what Diddie Wa Diddie means
I said, “Sister, I’ll soon be gone, just gimme that thing you sitting on”
Mister Diddie Wa Diddie
Mister Diddie Wa Diddie
I wish somebody would tell me what Diddie Wa Diddie means
Then I got put out of church, ’cause I talk about Diddie Wa Diddie too much
Mister Diddie Wa Diddie
Mister Diddie Wa Diddie
I wish somebody would tell me what Diddie Wa Diddie means.
~~
Enjoy the show,
Leo

Beginnings Redux


How to explain evolution in less than 4 minutes? Here’s my humble attempt.

In this production I used: Multiple Screens, Blue and Green Screens, Animations, Multiple Layers and several other special effects to achieve the unique look and feel.

Your comments are appreciated, enjoy the viewing,

Leo

Along came a Tango


When I decided to put together this piece had to deal with 4 different media, in different formats, sizes and codex. So I began to strip audio from the live video recording, remastering it and adding a layer of voice overs. These were created from text to speech,  formatted, changed in pitch  and amplified to produce an echo-like sound in the background.

From then on I edited the video and mixed it with the tango dance (that was performed to a different music and muted) Since the dance was more like a classical ballet, rather than tango I liked the effect that would be created by pairing it to a modern and mournful tango. All that said, added scenery and stills from those years mentioned in the lyrics and the concept became a reality.

Personally, enjoyed the discovery and melding of styles and consider it to be an exceptional piece of history, folklore and nostalgia all wrapped in a beautiful package.

~~

Ballet-like dance to a modern tango. Superbly interpreted and performed by Gisela Natoli and Gustavo Rosas.
Scenery from Montevideo, Uruguay and Buenos Aires, Argentina.
Music: Gotan Project (live) remix and audio voice-over overlays by Leo Bar.
Enjoy the show,
Leo

 

New York Shakes 24-7


This production was developed with 1950’s and 60’s exceptional photographs of NYC and their people by Samuel Gottscho and Vivian Maier.  I also used footage from Archive.org ; “NY Staten Island Ferry” from the Prelinger archives.
Music is Afro Blue by Triplexity (Nikila, SaReGaMa and Hamelin Bérengnier) @ HTTP://www.Jamendo.com  Remix by Leo Bar
(You may notice artifacts and pixellation in some photos or video sequences, these were caused by enlarging small formats into HD format)
All other effects are my fault and I take credit for them 🙂
Enjoy the show,
Leo

A little tap will do you


I made this video in November of 2012 and set it aside. After the tragic events that took place in Boston, MA this month I decided to post it so it could bring some cheer back into our lives.

Enjoy the moment,

Leo
~~~
Music: Oscar Woods – Don’t Sell It Don’t Give It Away – In the Public Domain
Video and Film Clips:
Gregory Hines – Let the man dance
Bill “Bojangles” Robinson – Cafe Metropole, Deleted Scenes
Savion Glover – Live Performance, at ABC show
Bill “Bojangles” Robinson – Stormy Weather

Audio MIx & Special Effects: Leo Bar
Digital Art – Photography: Leo Bar

Tango Euro Klez


Music: Tango Bar & Kiev Swing by Garry B :: https://vimeo.com/garryb; listen to his music :: http://soundcloud.com/garry-b
~
– The migration of tango from Argentina and Uruguay to Western and Eastern Europe
1900 – 1920 : Tangos were mainly sung and played by small instrumental bands (fundamentally trios and quartets), until “La Orquesta Tipica” arrives on the scene, with the incorporation of the bandoneo’n. In 1907, one of the very first genuine Argentine Tangueros to visit Paris (France) was composer Angel Villoldo, who wanted to do some recording. (At the time, Paris had the best recording facilities and techniques.) In 1918, writing lyrics for the tango became all the rage with singers such as the tragic Carlos Gardel and celebrated salon orchestras like Francisco Canaro‘s giving the music a new legitimacy and acceptance. Carlos Gardel is still revered today, many decades after his death.
~~
By 1912, dancers and musicians from Buenos Aires, traveled to Europe and the first European tango craze took place in Paris, soon followed by London, Berlin, and other capitals. Towards the end of 1913 it hit New York in the USA, and Finland.
~
One of the most popular ballroom dances in Europe during the 1920’s and 30’s was unquestionably the tango. This explains why this music appeared later in ghettos and concentration camps. Following a boom in Western Europe, the tango reached the east by the late 1910’s. However, as opposed to countries like France and Germany, frequently visited by Argentine Orquestas Típicas, most Eastern European countries became acquainted with the tango only through records, the radio and journals. This indirect connection may explain the character that this music developed in such regions. With increasing popularity and a new stream of local tangos, the style’s re-embodiment gradually drifted away from the South American model. Poland, which had regained its independence after the Warsaw treaty of 1919, quickly became one of the capitals of European tango at a time when most of its musicians, both in the classical and the popular scenes, were Jewish.
~
Enjoy the show,
Leo

Tango a la Celeste


The connection between Tango – Football (soccer)- and the Uruguayan National Team. Twice World Cup Winners, and 15 times Americas Cup winner.
This piece is dedicated to my Vimeofriends:
Ben :: vimeo.com/benvideos – For his generosity and love of the sport of football (soccer in U.S.)
Michael M :: vimeo.com/michaelmoller – For his tenacity in learning the art of video making, and his extreme patience with editing.
~
Started to make this video in November of 2011, and finished it January of 2013. It went through 9 versions in its chaotic initial life. This has been the most difficult project to date. It involved film clips from 1930’s, 1950’s, 2010 and other sundry dates. All these formats, codecs, frame rates and scales were totally different and a real challenge to assemble them into a cohesive work. What you see is mostly untouched and in its original color/grain.
Music: Astor Piazzolla – Michelangelo 70

The connection between Tango – Football – and the Uruguayan National Team. Twice World Cup Winners, and 15 times Americas Cup winner.
This piece is dedicated to my Vimeofriends:
Ben :: vimeo.com/benvideos – For his generosity and love of the sport of football (soccer in U.S.)
Michael M :: vimeo.com/michaelmoller – For his tenacity in learning the art of video making, and his extreme patience with editing.
~
Started to make this video in November of 2011, and finished it January of 2013. It went through 9 versions in its chaotic initial life. This has been one of my most difficult projects to date. It involved film clips from 1930, 1950, 2010 and other sundry dates. All these formats and scales were totally different and a real challenge to make them into a cohesive work. What you see is mostly untouched and in its original color/grain.
Music: Astor Piazzolla – Michelangelo 70
Enjoy the show,
Leo