Tag Archives: New York

Funky New York


Scenes from New York circa 1940’s
Music by David Nederland – Tell Me About Oriental Philosophy
jamendo.com/en/list/a146643/good-time-to-start
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

Containing great old photographs by:
Brett Weston (originally Theodore Brett Weston; December 16, 1911, Los Angeles–January 22, 1993, Hawaii) was an American photographer. Van Deren Coke described Brett Weston as the “child genius of American photography.” He was the second of the four sons of photographer Edward Weston and Flora Chandler.
~
Todd Webb (September 5, 1905 – April 15, 2000) was an American photographer notable for documenting everyday life and architecture in cities such as New York, Paris as well as from the American west.[1] His photography has been compared with Harry Callahan, Berenice Abbott, Walker Evans, and the French photographer Eugène Atget. He traveled extensively during his long life and had important friendships with artists such as Georgia O’Keeffe, Ansel Adams and Harry Callahan. His life was like his photos in the sense of being seemingly simple, straightforward, but revealing complexity and depth upon a closer examination. Capturing history, his pictures often transcend the boundary between photography and artistic expression.

Enjoy the funk,
Leo

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New York Swings


Not much to tell about this piece, it speaks for itself, or rather swings by itself 🙂
(Check out what cocktails at nightclubs were going for…)
Enjoy the moves and great sound!

Leo

New York – Two Harlems and Timbales


Come to Spanish Harlem and take a cultural bath!

This is a brief slice of the two of NYC’s neighborhoods, their people and cultures.

Enjoy the show,
Leo
~ History and Background ~
Harlem is known internationally as the Black Mecca of the world, but Harlem has been home to many races and ethnic groups including the Dutch, Irish, German, Italian, and Jewish. Harlem was originally settled by the Dutch in 1658, but was largely farmland and undeveloped territory for approximately 200 years. As New York’s population grew, residential and commercial expansion moved northward, and development of the Harlem territory was expanded.

Hundreds of tenement apartment buildings were built in 1904 anticipating the masses from lower Manhattan to occupy them. Unfortunately for the developers, the IRT subway not only made Harlem available to those from downtown, but also made Washington Heights, the Bronx and other northern points accessible. Developers over speculated and many houses went unsold. Real estate agent and entrepreneur Phillip A. Payton approached several Harlem landlords with the proposition that he would fill their empty or partially occupied properties with Black tenants. The idea was accepted and Payton began moving Black families into buildings of Central Harlem in the 1930’s .

Blacks continued to pour into Harlem from points in lower Manhattan, the American South and the Caribbean. Blacks migrated in record numbers from the south to northern cities in search of opportunities and increased wages.

Considered a stronghold of Latino pride, Spanish Harlem evolved from an immigrant enclave to a multi-cultural treasure trove of sights, sounds, tastes and cultural expressions. The heartbeat of the “Nuyorican” soul, Spanish Harlem is the birthplace of many of Latin music’s most favored artists, such as Tito Puente, Eddie & Charlie Palmieri, Ray Barretto and the home of others from international composer Rafael Hernandez to the great Machito. The popular feminist poet Julia De Burgos lived here while “youngblood” graffiti artist of chalk on the street verses, James de la Vega has a storefront from where he sells his visual wares.

Come to Spanish Harlem and take a cultural bath.

New York Shakes 24-7


This production was developed with 1950’s and 60’s exceptional photographs of NYC and their people by Samuel Gottscho and Vivian Maier.  I also used footage from Archive.org ; “NY Staten Island Ferry” from the Prelinger archives.
Music is Afro Blue by Triplexity (Nikila, SaReGaMa and Hamelin Bérengnier) @ HTTP://www.Jamendo.com  Remix by Leo Bar
(You may notice artifacts and pixellation in some photos or video sequences, these were caused by enlarging small formats into HD format)
All other effects are my fault and I take credit for them 🙂
Enjoy the show,
Leo

New York Dream


New York Dream from PIX IN MOTION by Leo Bar on Vimeo.

 

 

A whimsical look at NYC from some choice angles and locations. The theme revolves around dreams by park “sleepers” and their fantasies.

Special thanks to Ed Yourdon at http://www.flickr.com/photos/yourdon/  for some unusual photographs of the city and its people. Some time lapses are from stock footage. Others are pseudo time lapses, some are real 🙂

Enjoy the show,

Leo

Tango Euro Klez


Music: Tango Bar & Kiev Swing by Garry B :: https://vimeo.com/garryb; listen to his music :: http://soundcloud.com/garry-b
~
– The migration of tango from Argentina and Uruguay to Western and Eastern Europe
1900 – 1920 : Tangos were mainly sung and played by small instrumental bands (fundamentally trios and quartets), until “La Orquesta Tipica” arrives on the scene, with the incorporation of the bandoneo’n. In 1907, one of the very first genuine Argentine Tangueros to visit Paris (France) was composer Angel Villoldo, who wanted to do some recording. (At the time, Paris had the best recording facilities and techniques.) In 1918, writing lyrics for the tango became all the rage with singers such as the tragic Carlos Gardel and celebrated salon orchestras like Francisco Canaro‘s giving the music a new legitimacy and acceptance. Carlos Gardel is still revered today, many decades after his death.
~~
By 1912, dancers and musicians from Buenos Aires, traveled to Europe and the first European tango craze took place in Paris, soon followed by London, Berlin, and other capitals. Towards the end of 1913 it hit New York in the USA, and Finland.
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One of the most popular ballroom dances in Europe during the 1920’s and 30’s was unquestionably the tango. This explains why this music appeared later in ghettos and concentration camps. Following a boom in Western Europe, the tango reached the east by the late 1910’s. However, as opposed to countries like France and Germany, frequently visited by Argentine Orquestas Típicas, most Eastern European countries became acquainted with the tango only through records, the radio and journals. This indirect connection may explain the character that this music developed in such regions. With increasing popularity and a new stream of local tangos, the style’s re-embodiment gradually drifted away from the South American model. Poland, which had regained its independence after the Warsaw treaty of 1919, quickly became one of the capitals of European tango at a time when most of its musicians, both in the classical and the popular scenes, were Jewish.
~
Enjoy the show,
Leo

New York Faces 1950 – 60’s


This is one more chapter in the New York City vintage collection. It concentrates on capturing the faces and expressions of the average and not so average New Yorker. Several celebrities are caught in the act while posing for the camera. Also captured in their amazement are brand new immigrants from places around the globe.

The construction of this production started with the concept of pinning the Statue of Liberty as the centerpiece and “most recognized face” of NYC. From then on I used old films and a fair amount of Vivian Maier’s candid photographs that capture the human condition so well. Some images may be slightly distorted since they had to be reformatted to comply with the 16:9 wide format.

A look at some peculiar "faces" of New York in the 1950's decade.

This short piece contains street photographs taken by Vivian Maier, an American of French and Austro-Hungarian extraction, amateur photo-bug and nanny. The photographs were discovered in a thrift auction house on Chicago’s Northwest Side in 2007. She actually appears in one sequence, taking a self portrait against a mirror or window. Many of the scenes revolve around the Statue of Liberty, presenting very unusual angles and takes. There are also famous celebrities faces caught as they were doing "their thing".
Enjoy the ride,
Leo

Music: Cool – Dave Grusin Band
Leonard Bernstein, composer. Dave Grusin, arranger.
http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/dave-grusin-presents-west/id17768891
Photographs: Vivian Maier, Leo Bar
Paintings – Poster: Gil Elvgren
Vintage Film: New York Public Library, Library of Congress, Archive.org (all in the public domain)